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Prudential's Vice Chairman believes it is imperative for—and incumbent upon—companies to provide tools and resources to help employees grow into new and future roles.

By Ron Varrial

June 26, 2019

Sixty-five percent of the jobs that today’s elementary school students will eventually hold don’t even have names yet.

That’s a prediction from the World Economic Forum. And it’s just one proof point that demonstrates why continuous learning and a focus on skills development remain critical at work.

Prudential Vice Chairman Rob Falzon, joined by Microsoft’s Peggy Johnson, tackled that topic head on in a session at the Aspen Ideas Festival on “Today’s Investments for Tomorrow’s Global Workforce.”

Both Falzon and Johnson agreed it’s imperative for—and incumbent upon—companies to provide tools and resources to help employees grow into new and future roles.

“It’s critical to learn how to learn,” Falzon said. “It’s not just skills education, it’s about teaching people how to develop a continuous learning capability.”

Prudential has existed for a century longer than Microsoft. But that doesn’t mean the two companies, from different industries, aren’t experiencing a similar sea change.

“I listened to Peggy, from a technology company, and I hear how they’ve got so many of the same experiences we’re having, despite Prudential being around 100 years longer,” Falzon said. “They’re seeing the technological transformation and the future of work just as we are. It tells me, this is a challenge we’re all going to tackle.”

Read Falzon’s piece on how Prudential is addressing the skills gap on Business Insider.

To speak to Rob about the future of work and how companies like Prudential can address the skills gap, contact Laura Burke.